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By February 5, 2015 0 Comments Read More →

FDA Sees No Safety Issues with Agglomerated Corks

Diam corksYesterday Wine Industry Insight (WII) published a story regarding the health safety of the adhesive used in some agglomerate cork. Today the FDA responded:

Based on the data and information available to us, we have identified no safety issues with this use of TDI-based PU in agglomerated corks.” WII

The FDA further asserts that it has obtained data from companies involved in production of agglomerated cork, and does not anticipate any enforcement action, nor does it recommend in interruption in its use or production.

In yesterday’s article WII raised the specter of a possible recall of the approximately 350 million agglomerated corks used in the United States each year forcing cork manufacturers to respond.

Portocork, producer of the micro agglomerated product commercially named “Neutrocork”, responded in a letter to their clients.

We want to immediately assure our customers that the safety of our products has been reviewed by US and internationally-recognized experts in food safety and the results of this review were subsequently submitted to the FDA.”

Diam Bouchage also issued a statement (published by WII) assuring the full compliance, safety, and cooperation with federal authorities in the matter.

Diam makes very safe, high-quality corks. They are all in full regulatory compliance in both Europe and the United States. Their safety has been verified by several independent labs, and they have been in the marketplace for 10 years without a single credible safety issue.”

With the FDA and major cork manufacturers seemingly in agreement that agglomerated cork is not a health safety issue, the WII story is supported by the accusation of an unnamed synthetic cork association who could stand to benefit from discredit of agglomerated cork in the lower end of the wine closure segment.


By Kim Johannsen

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